Review of Relationship Reveal: Sandra Fischer’s, ’88, Newest Relationship Card Game

Photo Credit: RelationshipReveal.com

Photo Credit: RelationshipReveal.com

Many people struggle to express their emotions, wants and needs adequately, especially in intimate relationships. In any healthy relationship, communication is key, and the lack of it can lead to conflict. Communication is the central focus of the Relationship Reveal card game, which aims to help achieve fulfilling, lasting relationships among couples and singles alike. 

Relationship Reveal was written and created by University of the Pacific alum Sandra Fischer. Fischer, ‘88 COP, aims to better understand human relationships and places a high value on expressing your true feelings without judgment. These values manifest themselves within the game, which aims to help people express their genuine emotions and desires in their relationships. The game requires players to explore the good and bad about each other, which leads to a greater understanding of their own needs and desires. The game includes two decks of 64 card labeled as “Skills,” a quick start guide, an activity map and a guidebook of information about each skill. 

“I want people to learn to be confident and unafraid of what they want and who they are, and to be able to be kind to each other, even in the face of disappointment and pain,” Fischer said in an interview. Although Relationship Reveal might not be your typical card game for a Saturday night with friends, it is a lot more beneficial than any game of “LIFE” you might play. The game involves quite a bit of reading and discussing. Players can focus on expressing themselves in a unique way while improving their relationships at the same time. What I find most interesting about the game is that you can still play as a single man or woman. One of the cards in the “Skills” deck is labeled “Know Yourself.” According to Fischer, this card is one of the most important in the deck, because “when you know yourself you can better articulate what you want and need from your relationship.”


What I also find beneficial about the game is that there is an equal amount of focus on yourself as there is the person you’re playing with. By deepening your own self-knowledge in partnership, it is easier to help your partner understand what you want out of the relationship. Additionally, hearing your partner explore their sense of self helps you better understand the characteristics they value most in the relationship.

The game also requires baring yourself vulnerable, by displaying each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and coming to accept it. I believe that this above anything puts an emphasis on the honesty and empathy that Fischer values so much.

With the intimacy and genuine nature of the game, it is no wonder it received the Silver Medal in the relationship/marriage category in the 2016 Living Now Book Awards. There are few methods that will allow couples to explore the skills of respect, spirituality, reliability, and so much more the way that Relationship Reveal does. With that, it is clear that it is a game that couples should try out in order cultivate empathy within their relationships.

To learn more about Relationship Reveal or creator Sandra Fischer, please visit relationshipreveal.com.

Photo Credit: relationshipreveal.com. Pictured: Creator of card game “Relationship Reveal” and Pacific Alumnus Sandra Fischer, ’88.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Natalia Gevara

Share