Movie Review: Sausage Party

Brenda (Kristen Wiig), Frank (Seth Rogen), Sammy (Ed Norton) in Columbia Pictures' SAUSAGE PARTY.

Brenda (Kristen Wiig), Frank (Seth Rogen), Sammy (Ed Norton) in Columbia Pictures’ SAUSAGE PARTY.

Columbia Pictures’ “Sausage Party.”
© 2016 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
A cartoon movie of talking food would usually be looked at as a children’s movie. In the case of the movie “Sausage Party,” this is most definitely not true. In fact, it’s the polar opposite of any “Veggie Tales” movie you saw as a kid. But if you’re a fan of unapologetically crude humor, “Sausage Party” is definitely for you. Created by and starring Seth Rogen, the raunchy comedy tells the tale of grocery store items dreaming of being purchased by humans in order to see “the  Great Beyond.” It also includes an abundance of sexual content, pot smoking, and language that’s hopefully not in your five-year-old’s vocabulary. If you’re wondering how crude a comedy about food can be, perhaps you should go watch it, but I promise you won’t be able to consume hot dogs or tacos the same way again. Although I found “Sausage Party” a little too explicit for my taste, I see how it’s revolutionary. Seth Rogen tookan entire medium of movie-making and went somewhere many film-makers wouldn’t dare to go. Cartoons not suited for a PG audience aren’t uncommon. With TV shows like “Family Guy” and “The Simpsons,” many people are accustomed to seeing such humor in animated form. By taking the same idea and turning it into a full-length feature film, Rogen managed to challenge the concept that animation is just “kid’s stuff.”
Additionally, Rogen managed to incorporate political and religious commentary within “Sausage Party.” The feud between the Middle Eastern and Jewish food items having to share an aisle is an obvious  satire on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, personified through a talking lavash and bagel respectively. Religious satire is apparent through the main character, a sausage named Frank, challenging the view of “the Great Beyond,” and arguing that the other grocery items are being blissfully ignorant to the painful truth. Of course, the most obvious and perhaps to some, most entertaining, part of the entire film is the rude humor. In my perspective, Rogen saw portraying the main characters as food items as an avenue to do pretty much anything he wants within the films. Otherwise (spoiler alert!), I don’t think having a full on orgy at the end of the film would be allowed to play in a public movie theater any other way.
A vulgar animated film is somewhat of a culture-shock in the United States, but by continuing to push these boundaries, soon enough cartoons will be a source of entertainment for all ages. I might not find the humor tasteful in “Sausage Party,” but it challenges conventional animation in a virtually harmless way, and I can respect that.
If you’re Pacific student who hasn’t had the chance to see this wholesome film, no worries, it’s set to play at the Janet Leigh Theatre on campus from November 10th to 12th.
Carl (Jonah Hill, 2nd), Barry (Michael Cera, 3d) and Frank (Seth Rogen, rt) in Columbia Pictures' SAUSAGE PARTY.
Carl (Jonah Hill, 2nd), Barry (Michael Cera, 3rd) and Frank (Seth Rogen, rt) in Columbia Pictures’ SAUSAGE PARTY.
Columbia Pictures’ “Sausage Party.”
© 2016 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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Natalia Gevara

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